THE AFRICAN IN ME

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Beautiful Mt. KENYA ♥♥♥♥

‘I am African and I love it’.
That is a statement that I am now proud to say out loud without shying. There was a time I could have given up everything to be a shade lighter simply because I didn’t feel beautiful enough. Whoever came up with the notion that if you’re light you’re automatically beautiful lied to lots of souls. The dark chocolate complexion is something that I have come to appreciate and I think it’s a mark of identity.
I hated it when mom would talk to me in kikuyu (my mother tongue) because I felt it wasn’t westernised enough and it made me uncool and I recall being embarrassed. Right now if there is one thing I am so grateful for is that I can express myself fluently in the language.  I find it sassy and sophisticated where one can speak their mother tongue as well as they can express themselves in English or Swahili.
I think neo-colonialism is still active in the minds of many and I believe that we should be proud of our roots  and heritage.  We should teach our children and generations after to be proud of their culture and their origin.
I converse with plenty of people, old and young and when the old talk to me in kikuyu and I am able to respond back you can see the pride in their eyes. Like some sort of hope.
There’s this swahili quote that goes like
‘Mwacha mila ni mtumwa’  which means whoever leaves his culture is a slave.
Loving my culture doesn’t mean I promote tribalism or I’m not cool. The sad fact is that the world is developing fast and becoming westernised making young people not want to associate with their culture.  If we take the good in the African culture and customs I think it’s a plus to us.
I am proud to be African
I am proud to be Kenyan

5 thoughts on “THE AFRICAN IN ME”

  1. This was such an interesting post! As someone with European roots, it has always fascinated me when someone actively preserves his or her culture, and especially if that culture is different than my own. Admittedly, I know little about African cultures and cannot personally relate to any related stigma. Posts like this help us become a little less ignorant, thanks for sharing 🙂

    Like

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